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Roman Polanski

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2006
Stephen Farber, a leading film critic and historian will begin a new film series "Reel Talk With Stephen Farber" at the Wadsworth Theatre for 10 Monday nights beginning Feb. 6. (No "Real Talk" February 20.) The series is an extraordinary where the public will be introduced to the inner workings of Hollywood through previewing a new movie, likely one not yet in release, and to then hear filmmakers discuss the film. Faber will moderate each discussion. Faber is currently the film critic and contributing editor for Moiveline's Hollywood Life magazine and a regular contributor to The New York Times.
NEWS
By Patrick Caneday | October 3, 2009
I?ve worked in the entertainment industry for almost 20 years. And in that time I?ve seen the bubble of self-importance in which A-List Hollywood resides. This has been only a minor personal annoyance for me. But with the recent uproar over Roman Polanski?s arrest, I can?t keep quiet. I know this isn?t really a local issue. But as the father of two daughters, I think it?s a human issue. We live in the entertainment capital of the world, many of us gainfully employed there, and this negatively affects all of us. Hollywood is already condemned for being morally depraved, and letting an admitted sex offender ignore his punishment does nothing to change that view.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | December 30, 2011
Structurally, Roman Polanski's “Carnage” hearkens back to his first feature, “Knife in the Water” (1962). “When a handful of people are stuck in a confined space, the layers of civilized social convention are peeled away, revealing hidden savagery beneath”: that would serve nicely as a TV schedule description of either film. “Knife in the Water” showed a couple and one stranger on a yacht; “Carnage,” two couples in the living room of a New York apartment. The main action here is book-ended by two short scenes in a local park, the first of which sets up the situation: A group of 11-year-olds are having some sort of dispute - we see this from at least a hundred feet away, so it's hard to be sure exactly what's at stake - ending with one of them whacking another on the head with a hockey stick.
NEWS
January 22, 2003
Jeff Klemzak of La Crescenta owns a roofing business. "The Pianist," Roman Polanski's tale of one man's journey through the Warsaw Ghetto during the Nazi occupation, is one of the finest films I've seen in quite some time. The story is told with a richness and depth that carries the viewer on an emotional see-saw, from the heights of superbly performed classical music to the depths of Nazi depravity. Adrien Brody plays Wladyslaw Szpilman, a famous concert pianist whose work was familiar to Polish listeners in the days just prior to World War II. Szpilman and his family are forced by the Nazis from their comfortable Warsaw home into spare and unheated quarters in the living hell of the newly created Jewish ghetto.
FEATURES
October 24, 2009
I’m a longtime homeowner in Glendale who has lived here for more than 35 years. I’m wondering why the City Council is taking so long to decide whether homeowners may replace brown, dirty, dead, dried-up lawns with beautiful, lush, low-cost, water-saving artificial sod? What is taking so long? We need a decision soon! What is the holdup? Let’s save water and do the right thing! This is not brain surgery, rocket science or nuclear negotiations — it is artificial sod!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2011
There are numerous inherent flaws and absurdities in the process of compiling Top 10s and Best ofs; nonetheless, here are my favorite films released in Los Angeles in the calendar year 2011. In my version of this imperfect exercise, “favorite” is almost (but not exactly) congruent with “best.” Some years it's tough to scrape up 10 films worth mentioning; other years it's tough to cut the worthy list down to a mere 10. This year, I'm glad to say, was one of the latter. So I'm going to segregate animation and documentaries to shoehorn in a few extras.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2006
Stephen Farber, one of the country's leading film critics and historians, will continue his film series Reel Talk with Stephen Farber at the Wadsworth Theatre for 10 Monday nights at 7 p.m. beginning June 5. Reel Talk with Stephen Farber is presented in partnership with RICHMARK Entertainment and Landmark Theatres. The series is an extraordinary one ? the public can see a new film (likely one not yet in release) and then hear a discussion with the filmmaker, lead actor, or other important personnel from the film.
FEATURES
October 31, 2009
Andrew Hagler’s letter in Thursday’s Glendale News-Press, “Ready for ‘reality’ to end,” is spot on. Many years ago, Newton Minow lamented that television was a vast wasteland. It can now best be described as a toxic dump. The dumbing down of America has been accomplished. MARIE FISH Glendale   Important election in Crescenta Valley We are a few days away from an important election in Crescenta Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan James | September 15, 2006
"The most famous unsolved murder in L.A. history" goes up against "the most famous unsolved murder in Hollywood" in this month's big screen noir-off between director Allen Coulter's "Hollywoodland" and director Brian De Palma's "The Black Dahlia". Is the theater big enough for both of them? Only the weekend grosses will tell. Hollywood has an endless fascination with Hollywood. From the final days of World War II, that fascination has cranked out classic screenplays twisting the seamy backstory of stardom into tangled tales of tinsel city -- Los Angeles.
NEWS
July 17, 2010
Few drives are more monotonous than Golden State (5) Freeway through California's Central Valley. But what does make it worse is a big-rig crashing into a tractor-trailer, bursting into flames and closing three of the five southbound lanes when you're trying to get home from a family vacation. One's mind wanders in inching traffic, 90-plus-degree heat and having exhausted "99 Bottles of Scotch on the Wall." So here are a few things I thought about while stuck on the Grapevine the other day; more musings from the Muffin Top Man: One of these days, Thing 1, my 8-year-old daughter, is going to figure out that we've never put film into that cheap camera she's been playing with since she was 3. And on that day, there will be much fear and trembling and gnashing of teeth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | December 30, 2011
Structurally, Roman Polanski's “Carnage” hearkens back to his first feature, “Knife in the Water” (1962). “When a handful of people are stuck in a confined space, the layers of civilized social convention are peeled away, revealing hidden savagery beneath”: that would serve nicely as a TV schedule description of either film. “Knife in the Water” showed a couple and one stranger on a yacht; “Carnage,” two couples in the living room of a New York apartment. The main action here is book-ended by two short scenes in a local park, the first of which sets up the situation: A group of 11-year-olds are having some sort of dispute - we see this from at least a hundred feet away, so it's hard to be sure exactly what's at stake - ending with one of them whacking another on the head with a hockey stick.
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NEWS
By Patrick Caneday | October 3, 2009
I?ve worked in the entertainment industry for almost 20 years. And in that time I?ve seen the bubble of self-importance in which A-List Hollywood resides. This has been only a minor personal annoyance for me. But with the recent uproar over Roman Polanski?s arrest, I can?t keep quiet. I know this isn?t really a local issue. But as the father of two daughters, I think it?s a human issue. We live in the entertainment capital of the world, many of us gainfully employed there, and this negatively affects all of us. Hollywood is already condemned for being morally depraved, and letting an admitted sex offender ignore his punishment does nothing to change that view.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2006
Stephen Farber, a leading film critic and historian will begin a new film series "Reel Talk With Stephen Farber" at the Wadsworth Theatre for 10 Monday nights beginning Feb. 6. (No "Real Talk" February 20.) The series is an extraordinary where the public will be introduced to the inner workings of Hollywood through previewing a new movie, likely one not yet in release, and to then hear filmmakers discuss the film. Faber will moderate each discussion. Faber is currently the film critic and contributing editor for Moiveline's Hollywood Life magazine and a regular contributor to The New York Times.
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