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Rosh Hashana

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By Jeremy Oberstein | September 12, 2007
The High Holidays, which begin at sundown tonight, are a time when many Jews look inward, reflecting on mistakes made in the past year and resolving to amend those in the year ahead. But some synagogues are looking at global crises in their search for redemption during Rosh Hashana festivities this year. Rabbi Richard Flom, lead rabbi at Burbank’s Temple Emanu El, will focus on Darfur, Hurricane Katrina and global warming during the celebration of year 5768. “Tzedakah is our theme for the year,” Flom said, in reference to the Jewish concept of charity.
FEATURES
By Ryan Vaillancourt | September 14, 2007
As the sun settled at dusk Thursday on the backs of turtles bobbing in a koi pond at Brand Park, a heartfelt, sustained whimper echoed throughout the area. Meant to imitate the sound of a human’s cry, the noise came from a shofar — or ram’s horn — blown by Rabbi Simcha Backman, who led a Rosh Hashana service at the park. The traditional blowing of the shofar takes place during a moment of introspection in the service, when congregants summon their sins, grab hold of them and throw them away at the start of the Jewish new year.
NEWS
September 21, 2009
Jewish religious leaders with the Chabad Jewish Center celebrated Rosh Hashana on Monday night at the Brand Park Japanese Tea Garden by casting off sins into the water. The High Holiday is commonly referred to as the Jewish New Year, marking a new cycle in the Hebrew calendar for people and legal contracts. The holiday, from sunset Friday to sunset Sunday, also marks the 10-day run-up to Yom Kippur, which is Sept. 27. Rosh Hashana is characterized by the blowing of the shofar, a trumpet made from a ram’s horn that’s intended to symbolically awaken listeners from their “slumbers” and alert them to coming judgment.
NEWS
September 10, 2004
Jackie Conley Music will be the theme this year when Temple Sinai celebrates Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year 5765. The 10-day period of repentance and prayer will begin with an evening service at 8 p.m. Wednesday, followed by a one-hour "Family Service" at 9 a.m. Thursday. This year's services will feature music by the choir and orchestra, led by the temple's cantorial soloist Mariana Gindlin. In addition to the keyboard and church organ, the program will feature a cello and harp.
NEWS
By: Elia Powers | October 4, 2005
When the sound of the shofar reverberates through the synagogue today, it's time to ring in the year 5766. Rosh Hashana, the holiday that signifies the start of the Jewish New Year, began Monday night and continues today with services and the traditional blowing of the ram's horn, called the shofar. The High Holy Days are the most important time on the Jewish calendar. They include Rosh Hashana and the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, which is Oct. 12. It's a time of quiet introspection, when Jews across the world contemplate the past year and atone for their sins.
NEWS
September 26, 2003
Josh Kleinbaum Allen Chroman saw the shofar in a store in the Old City of Jerusalem five years ago and could not resist. Steve Goby bought one at a Jewish bookstore in the Valley. Malka Mittelman was sitting in a Rosh Hashana service and heard the sound of the shofar and thought, "I can do that." Saturday, Chroman, Goby and Mittelman will be among eight shofar blowers at Temple Sinai of Glendale, as the 300-family congregation welcomes in the Jewish New Year, 5764.
NEWS
By Ryan Vaillancourt | September 22, 2007
GLENDALE ? The 10-day Jewish High Holidays come to a close at sundown tonight, culminating more than a week?s worth of introspection, spiritual renewal and a 24-hour fast for area Jews. Yom Kippur, the day of atonement and holiest day of the year in the Jewish tradition, commenced at sundown on Friday. Many local families gathered for late-afternoon meals to store up for the traditional fast observed during the holiday. Denied of all gastronomic distractions, people are forced to look their sins in the eye, said Rabbi Mark Sobel from Temple Beth Emet in Burbank.
NEWS
September 24, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum While most synagogues collect big bucks for tickets to Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur services, quietly continuing the common practice of using the High Holiday services as a fundraiser, one small branch within the Jewish community is bucking the trend. Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, begins at sundown tonight. At synagogues across the country, Jews will commemorate the solemn holiday with fasting and prayer. At most of those synagogues, including Glendale's Temple Sinai, congregants must purchase tickets that often cost more that $150 per person.
NEWS
September 7, 2007
The Foothills Community Business Expo takes place from 5 to 8 p.m. on Sept. 12 at the Verdugo Hills Hospital 4th Floor Council Rooms. This annual event showcases the many businesses located in the foothill area. All types of businesses will be represented, including housewares, foods, and more. It is sponsored by the Montrose-Verdugo City, Crescenta Valley, and La Cañada Flintridge Chambers of Commerce. There is no cost to attend this event. The North Fire in the Angeles National Forest, which has been burning since Sept.
NEWS
By: MICHELE MARR | September 29, 2005
{LDQUO}I'VE never seen a house with so many calendars," she said, then stood silently looking at me, as though expecting an explanation. My house is full of calendars. It's true, though it took a visitor to point it out. There's at least one calendar in every room. Most of them show up without much help from me. They come from my alumni association, graphic arts magazines and paper mills (because of the freelance graphic design I do), other businesses and charities, and as gifts from family and friends.
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NEWS
September 21, 2009
Jewish religious leaders with the Chabad Jewish Center celebrated Rosh Hashana on Monday night at the Brand Park Japanese Tea Garden by casting off sins into the water. The High Holiday is commonly referred to as the Jewish New Year, marking a new cycle in the Hebrew calendar for people and legal contracts. The holiday, from sunset Friday to sunset Sunday, also marks the 10-day run-up to Yom Kippur, which is Sept. 27. Rosh Hashana is characterized by the blowing of the shofar, a trumpet made from a ram’s horn that’s intended to symbolically awaken listeners from their “slumbers” and alert them to coming judgment.
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FEATURES
By Michael Arvizu | September 19, 2009
I am always in awe of other religions. This week, I had the privilege of photographing a lovely Jewish family from La Cañada for a story written by La Cañada Valley Sun columnist Anita Susan Brenner. The Harris family ? Tiffany, Marc, and kids Isaac, Rachel and Brooklyn ? were very patient and helpful throughout the shoot, even though it was scheduled to start at 8:15 p.m. I wanted to make sure everyone was home. Marc was dressed in his traditional prayer shawl, while Tiffany, Isaac and Brooklyn took turns playing a shofar, or ram?
FEATURES
By Jeremy Oberstein | September 29, 2008
GLENDALE — Jews from around the region and world will take a break from their daily routines on Tuesday to honor the Jewish New Year that kicks off the 5,769th year on the Hebrew calendar. The Rosh Hashana holiday, which begins at sundown tonight, brings with it a multitude of themes, which local Rabbis will espouse when they address congregants Tuesday morning, on the first day of the celebration, and on Wednesday, when the festival is set to conclude. Rabbi Richard Flom, who leads Burbank’s Temple Emanu El, crafted a sermon to address what he calls “the strangers among us” — societies’ minorities ignored or shunned because of their third party status.
NEWS
By Ryan Vaillancourt | September 22, 2007
GLENDALE ? The 10-day Jewish High Holidays come to a close at sundown tonight, culminating more than a week?s worth of introspection, spiritual renewal and a 24-hour fast for area Jews. Yom Kippur, the day of atonement and holiest day of the year in the Jewish tradition, commenced at sundown on Friday. Many local families gathered for late-afternoon meals to store up for the traditional fast observed during the holiday. Denied of all gastronomic distractions, people are forced to look their sins in the eye, said Rabbi Mark Sobel from Temple Beth Emet in Burbank.
FEATURES
By Ryan Vaillancourt | September 14, 2007
As the sun settled at dusk Thursday on the backs of turtles bobbing in a koi pond at Brand Park, a heartfelt, sustained whimper echoed throughout the area. Meant to imitate the sound of a human’s cry, the noise came from a shofar — or ram’s horn — blown by Rabbi Simcha Backman, who led a Rosh Hashana service at the park. The traditional blowing of the shofar takes place during a moment of introspection in the service, when congregants summon their sins, grab hold of them and throw them away at the start of the Jewish new year.
FEATURES
By Jeremy Oberstein | September 12, 2007
The High Holidays, which begin at sundown tonight, are a time when many Jews look inward, reflecting on mistakes made in the past year and resolving to amend those in the year ahead. But some synagogues are looking at global crises in their search for redemption during Rosh Hashana festivities this year. Rabbi Richard Flom, lead rabbi at Burbank’s Temple Emanu El, will focus on Darfur, Hurricane Katrina and global warming during the celebration of year 5768. “Tzedakah is our theme for the year,” Flom said, in reference to the Jewish concept of charity.
NEWS
By Ryan Vaillancourt | September 12, 2007
GLENDALE — After promising to veto a health-care reform bill passed by the state Legislature on Monday, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Tuesday called a special legislative session in hopes that lawmakers will reach a compromise that is less taxing on small businesses. The start of the session, which took effect immediately after Schwarzenegger’s announcement, came on the same day that the Legislature concluded its regular session to break for Rosh Hashana. In addition to health care, the special session will also provide a forum to continue debate on water policy, Schwarzenegger said.
NEWS
September 7, 2007
The Foothills Community Business Expo takes place from 5 to 8 p.m. on Sept. 12 at the Verdugo Hills Hospital 4th Floor Council Rooms. This annual event showcases the many businesses located in the foothill area. All types of businesses will be represented, including housewares, foods, and more. It is sponsored by the Montrose-Verdugo City, Crescenta Valley, and La Cañada Flintridge Chambers of Commerce. There is no cost to attend this event. The North Fire in the Angeles National Forest, which has been burning since Sept.
NEWS
By: | October 9, 2005
POLITICS Campbell wins primary with 45.6% of votes Republican state Sen. John Campbell on Tuesday took the most votes in a special primary to fill the 48th District Congressional seat, but his 45.6% of the ballots cast wasn't enough to head off a general election, which is set for Dec. 6. Had Campbell won 50% plus one vote, he would have become the successor to Rep. Chris Cox, who left to chair the Securities and...
NEWS
By: Elia Powers | October 5, 2005
This is the time of year when Mandy Wynn tends to feel homesick. She's settled into her life in Brooklyn, N.Y., but something about the Jewish High Holy Days gets her thinking about family traditions. And hers has plenty of them. The Sonenshines, one of the first families to join Newport Beach's Temple Bat Yahm, typically arrive early to synagogue for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur to secure a seat near the front. Three generations chant together, led by grandpa Ygal Sonenshine.
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