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By Erna Taylor-Stark | February 15, 2008
Though it was a very dark, blustery and cold evening, the parking lot and streets around Holy Redeemer School in Montrose were filled with the cars of families and friends attending the school’s science fair. Inside the school, the auditorium was bustling with energy, a myriad of displays and interested people looking, talking, and asking questions of the young scientists. Present in one corner was Nick Nielson who had invented and was demonstrating “The White Hippo.
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By Alison Kjeldgaard | May 6, 2009
Glendale resident John Shirajian, chairman of the science department at Ribét Academy, is proud of the student awards displayed in an unassuming hallway at the college preparatory school in Los Angeles. “The most rewarding thing [about working at Ribét] is getting kids into colleges they want,” Shirajian said. “[Past students] tell me how easy college is.” Since 2001, Ribét has hosted an annual Science and Technology Fair displaying all middle and high school student projects.
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By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | May 9, 2013
The Glendale Unified School District is going after a grant of almost $3 million to boost its science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs. The federal grant became available this spring as most states prepare to adopt new federal standards that further emphasize the programs, commonly known as STEM. Worth $2.99 million, the five-year grant would benefit Clark Magnet High School as well as Roosevelt, Rosemont, Toll and Wilson middle schools. As Glendale school officials wait for federal approval to turn in the grant's full application, they have submitted a seven-page pre-application and started considering how millions of dollars could benefit Glendale schools.
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July 12, 2002
Glendale children and others from throughout the area experienced what it might have felt like to discover a dinosaur bone Thursday at the Los Angeles Zoo's annual zooCamp. The zoo's summer camp runs through the end of August, and openings for additional children still are available, zoo spokeswoman Judy Shay said. Classes are given names like "Fantastic Fossils and Dynamite Dinosaurs," "Monkey Business" and "Mad About Science." Children this week dug through sand to find fossils, which they have been painting.
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By Anthony Kim | June 15, 2007
LA CRESCENTA — A science fair to help end the year at Dunsmore Elementary School on Thursday was a celebration of the physical sciences and a culmination of parent participation throughout the year. More than 15 booths showcased hands-on science activities in the school's auditorium — filling the room with exploding pops, electric crackles and tornado-like whirls. More than 150 students were in attendance. One booth featured a scaled-down Tesla coil, where students turned a crank to produce a current of electricity between two metal balls.
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May 11, 2000
Judy Seckler SALEM LUTHERAN SCHOOL -- When the cardboard displays are long gone, Salem Lutheran School students can still bask in the glow of winning honors at the yearly science fair. Third-grade winners were: First place: Allison Overgaard Second place: Thomas Harrison and Ariel Hart Third place: Matt Sanders, Jazmine Persing, and Nestor Luansing Fourth-grade winners were: First place: Rebecca Miller Second place: Andrew Favestveit Third place: Alex Sharp and Daniel Barrios Fifth-grade winners were: First place: Brian Delaney Second place: Stephen Chao Third place: Renee Saito Sixth-grade winners were: First place: Alyssa Ohanian Second place: Domique Navarro and Analiese DiConti Third place: Katie Kotrak, Lauren Styler, Geoff Sanders, Giselle Melik-Jahanian, and Andrew Lim
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January 10, 2004
Gary Moskowitz Rosemont Middle School teacher Carole Gilmer, known for her enthusiastic approach to teaching students about science and technology, died Jan. 3 after a long bout with cancer. She was 56. Gilmer joined the Glendale Unified School District in 1990 and taught eighth-grade science, math and adolescent skills classes at Rosemont for the duration of her service. She took a health leave in May 2001, and returned to school for a short period during the 2002-03 school year, officials said.
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By Angela Hokanson | January 18, 2008
Juan Villagomez watched gleefully as a wind-up grasshopper toy hopped and chattered across his desk Thursday morning at Cerritos Elementary School. It was among the materials that instructors from the Kidspace Children’s Museum in Pasadena brought to teach the third-graders about science topics such as energy sources and sound waves. Before unveiling the wind-up toys, one of the museum instructors, Ted Tegart, had showed the students a metal spring, and asked if they thought the spring could be an energy source.
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By Ani Amirkhanian | May 9, 2006
Crescenta Valley High School students were busy shooting baskets on Friday and playing a friendly game of basketball. But it wasn't your typical pick-up game. They played with a robot they designed and built in six weeks for a robotics competition. The robot moved on four wheels and shot the balls out of its "arm," or the cylinder tube that took the place of an arm. Engineering students apply the hands-on approach to learn the principles of engineering that prepare them for future careers in the industry.
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By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 3, 2014
For eight days last month, Crescenta Valley High teacher Christina Engen took night hikes in a Costa Rica jungle, observing leatherback sea turtles that were laying eggs along the coastline of the Pacuare Nature Reserve. Through Ecology Project International, the science teacher was one of two instructors from California to join more than a dozen other teachers from across the country who received fellowships to learn about Costa Rica's diverse ecology. While at the nature reserve, she worked alongside 18 researchers to track over 6-foot-long leatherback sea turtles as they came to shore to lay their eggs.
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By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | February 20, 2014
The creator of the next Instagram, Snapchat or Spotify could be from Burbank or Glendale as Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) launches a first-ever congressional challenge for students to create software applications that demonstrate students' interest in science, technology, engineering and math. Across the country, high school students are being challenged by their congressional representatives to create apps for computers, tablets and mobile devices through April. “For years, many of us have been pushing to have a congressional-approved science competition,” Schiff said.
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By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | January 31, 2014
Students at Hoover and Crescenta Valley high schools will compete Saturday in a regional competition to determine which team from across Southern California will compete in the National Science Bowl hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C. in April. The two Glendale high schools are among 31 school teams from San Juan Capistrano to Redondo Beach which will compete at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the regional contest. Sixteen-year-old Meagan Yuen, captain of Hoover High's science bowl team which formed at the start of the school year, said team members have been practicing for the bowl for two to three hours every Saturday since October.
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By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | December 7, 2013
Local students channeled their inner Tiger Woods on Friday at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in a competition to hit a hole-in-one in record time. The annual “Invention Challenge” called on middle and high school students, as well as JPL employees, to build a contraption that would hit a golf ball into a hole located about 5 feet away. The teams used materials such as vacuum-cleaner extensions, springs, mouse traps and angled pipes that dropped the ball with a “plop” into the hole.  They used sliders, pendulums and even compressed air to send the ball flying.
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By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 2, 2013
Fourteen science labs are slated to be upgraded at Crescenta Valley High School as part of an expanded renovation project that recently received additional funding from the Glendale Unified school board. School board members approved last week spending $1.7 million on top of $5 million they had already OKd to pay for construction of temporary classrooms that will house students during lab renovations and fund upgrades to two classrooms used by special education students. The improvements are overdue, according to school board member Greg Krikorian, who said the labs were passed over for renovations years ago when the school district ran out of its previous Measure K bond funds.
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By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 23, 2013
Two young Glendale residents are among 300 semi-finalists nationwide for a science and math competition set for next month in Washington, D.C. Francesca Legaspi and Daniel Yacoubian will find out next week if they will be one of 30 finalists competing for the $25,000 prize, provided by the Samueli Foundation. Francesca, who attends Incarnation School in Glendale, and Daniel, of Gregory Hovsepian School in Pasadena, applied to compete in the elite competition after performing well in science fairs at their respective schools, as well as fairs held by Los Angeles County and the California State Science Fair last spring.
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August 20, 2013
California leads U.S. states in science and engineering employment, according to a new report from researchers at the National Science Foundation . In 2011, the state employed 786,653 people in science and engineering jobs - nearly 14% of the 5.7 million workers in such occupations across the United States. New York and Texas were also science jobs standouts - but with 328,851 and 450,316 jobs, respectively, they trail the Golden State, the Los Angeles Times reported . The two local regions with the highest science and engineering employment were also in California: the Santa Clara or Silicon Valley area, with 143,329 jobs; and the Los Angeles region, with 141,719 jobs.
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By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | May 9, 2013
The Glendale Unified School District is going after a grant of almost $3 million to boost its science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs. The federal grant became available this spring as most states prepare to adopt new federal standards that further emphasize the programs, commonly known as STEM. Worth $2.99 million, the five-year grant would benefit Clark Magnet High School as well as Roosevelt, Rosemont, Toll and Wilson middle schools. As Glendale school officials wait for federal approval to turn in the grant's full application, they have submitted a seven-page pre-application and started considering how millions of dollars could benefit Glendale schools.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
Don't cut planetary science funding, members of Congress urged NASA on Friday. In a letter to NASA Administrator Charles Bolden , Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) and Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), urged the space agency to maintain funding levels for missions to Mars and the outer planets that were allocated by Congress this spring -- and not to react to budget pressures by making disproportionate cuts to the science budget. "While we fully understand that the funding levels ... are subject to change to reflect across-the-board and sequester cuts, we expect that the balance among programs will remain consistent with the structure directed by Congress," they wrote.
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By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | April 7, 2013
NASA's planetary science division - responsible for sending the rover Curiosity to Mars - will get an unexpected budget hike of $123 million for the rest of 2013. These additional funds will be used to continue planetary exploration, officials said. As part of a temporary spending bill signed by President Obama on Tuesday, Congress approved a budget of roughly $1.41 billion for the planetary science division, compared to about $1.19 billion in Obama's requested budget. "That means Congress values [the]
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