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By Brian McGackin | August 22, 2009
Print on demand and other self-publishing websites have made it easier than ever to get your life?s work in the hands of readers. Sites like Lulu, Xlibris and iUniverse customize the printing process to help writers reach the audience they?re specifically looking to reach. Some authors want to print only one copy of their masterpiece, to place on their shelf at home, or a few to hand out to family members and friends. Others use print-on-demand sites to publish copies of their book to send out to bookstores or larger publishing houses.
NEWS
February 13, 2002
Sandra Kraisirideja, Enjoy! GLENDALE -- Writer Tom Stapleton doesn't take no for an answer. When publishing houses declined to publish his novel -- a hard-boiled detective story filled with shady characters and femme fatales titled "Blue Ground" -- he did it himself. "There are three kinds of people: those who make things happen, those who watch things happen, and those who wonder, 'What happened?' I wanted to be the kind of person who made things happen," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Kim | September 5, 2007
Writing and self-publishing a children’s book about the friendship between a monkey too scared to swing and a giraffe may suffice in the land of imagination, but Glendale resident Mindy Goldhammer creates bonds of her own outside the world of make-believe camaraderie. Goldhammer recently completed her two-year project to write and self-publish her first children’s story, “Open Your Eyes,” about the friendship between Handoo, a vervet monkey, Hingles the giraffe, and a rhinoceros.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007
She’s described as "a trim woman, in her early sixties" with "salt and pepper hair" and an "athletic spring to her movements, [that] radiated elegance." If you read the books and meet the lady, you’ll have a hard time discerning which is which — the author or her private eye character whose air and demeanor radiate that same elegance and sprightly step. La Crescenta’s own Alice Zogg claims R.A. Huber, the fictional character in her series of mystery crime novels, isn’t really an alter ego. But, you might get a different response if you ask her friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian McGackin | December 1, 2010
Fifty years ago, if you wanted to get your book published, you either had to find an agent and a publisher willing to take a chance on your writing or buy your own printing press and learn how to print and bind the book yourself. Much like today, there were, of course, journals and literary magazines willing to print short stories and poetry, which might prove to a publisher your writing had merit, but in those situations the number of submissions always dwarfs the number of available slots.
NEWS
November 8, 2002
Gretchen Hoffman Michel Gagne doesn't always encourage people to follow their dream of self-publishing their comics. "If you just want to do one book or two books, go get a publisher," he said. "You should self-publish only if you're in it for the long haul." Gagne should know what he's talking about -- he quit his job in 1998 to found GAGNE International Press and has been writing, illustrating and publishing books and comics ever since. He and five other comics professionals took part in a panel discussion, "Animators Do Comics," at Glendale Central Library on Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian McGackin | August 18, 2011
Whenever possible, book reviewers will set out to make clear statements in their reviews on whether a book is “good” or “bad.” Strong plot, compelling themes and layered characters: good. Muddled prose, poor editing and heavy-handed description: bad. Not every book is so considerate as to lie clearly on one side of the good/bad line or the other, though, and the growing use of self-publishing companies like Xlibris to circumvent agents, editors and publishers means that the line will only continue to be blurred further.
NEWS
November 5, 2002
Man drives car at police SOUTHEAST GLENDALE -- A Glendale Police officer investigating a report of a prowler was nearly struck when the man tried to hit the officer with his car while trying to escape. The incident occurred shortly after 10 p.m. Sunday in an alley in the 200 block of South Chevy Chase Drive. Two officers had just entered the alley when a man drove his car around their squad car and at one of the officers, police reports said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian McGackin | May 13, 2011
Anyone can write a memoir these days. All that’s needed is some free time, the address of a self-publishing website and the desire to tell the world about all the spectacular things that were unique in your life. Unfortunately, not everyone can write a good memoir. The Rev. John G. Simmons, 94, who has been living in Burbank for the past 35 years, has written a good memoir. In fact, he has written a great memoir. Titled “A Sacred Rage: The Path of Constructive Conscience,” the book includes details about his childhood and anecdotes from his past, but the bulk of the book is dedicated to instilling in the reader that it is up to every person on this Earth to make the world a better place.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | April 3, 2013
In January 1969, when Wendy Lawless and her sister were living in New York's famed Dakota building, their mother swallowed a bottle of pills and called her husband - their stepfather - at his hotel to say goodbye. What followed was a troop of firemen entering their apartment building and breaking down the door to her mother's bedroom with axes in an effort to revive her, as Lawless and her sister watched. This is just one of the many fascinating stories from Lawless' new book, "Chanel Bonfire," a charming and heartfelt memoir chronicling her childhood with her unstable New York socialite mother, Georgann Rea. Rea is described as a "real-life Holly Golightly, who constantly reinvents herself as she trades up from trailer park to penthouse," and in the process suffers from breakdowns and suicide attempts while her two daughters grapple with the aftermath.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian McGackin | August 22, 2009
Print on demand and other self-publishing websites have made it easier than ever to get your life?s work in the hands of readers. Sites like Lulu, Xlibris and iUniverse customize the printing process to help writers reach the audience they?re specifically looking to reach. Some authors want to print only one copy of their masterpiece, to place on their shelf at home, or a few to hand out to family members and friends. Others use print-on-demand sites to publish copies of their book to send out to bookstores or larger publishing houses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007
She’s described as "a trim woman, in her early sixties" with "salt and pepper hair" and an "athletic spring to her movements, [that] radiated elegance." If you read the books and meet the lady, you’ll have a hard time discerning which is which — the author or her private eye character whose air and demeanor radiate that same elegance and sprightly step. La Crescenta’s own Alice Zogg claims R.A. Huber, the fictional character in her series of mystery crime novels, isn’t really an alter ego. But, you might get a different response if you ask her friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Kim | September 5, 2007
Writing and self-publishing a children’s book about the friendship between a monkey too scared to swing and a giraffe may suffice in the land of imagination, but Glendale resident Mindy Goldhammer creates bonds of her own outside the world of make-believe camaraderie. Goldhammer recently completed her two-year project to write and self-publish her first children’s story, “Open Your Eyes,” about the friendship between Handoo, a vervet monkey, Hingles the giraffe, and a rhinoceros.
NEWS
February 13, 2002
Sandra Kraisirideja, Enjoy! GLENDALE -- Writer Tom Stapleton doesn't take no for an answer. When publishing houses declined to publish his novel -- a hard-boiled detective story filled with shady characters and femme fatales titled "Blue Ground" -- he did it himself. "There are three kinds of people: those who make things happen, those who watch things happen, and those who wonder, 'What happened?' I wanted to be the kind of person who made things happen," he said.
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