Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsSpacecraft
IN THE NEWS

Spacecraft

FEATURED ARTICLES
THE818NOW
December 17, 2012
Space fanatics and NASA obsessives: Clear your afternoon calendar. At approximately 2:28 p.m. Monday, NASA will send its twin spacecrafts Ebb and Flow hurtling into the moon at 3,760 mph -- and the space agency will have a live play-by-play of the event, hosted by scientists in the control room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. The live feed begins at 2 and ends around 2:30. Unfortunately, you will not be able to see the two crashes because the lunar crater that will be their final resting places will be in shadow at the time.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 12, 2009
LA CAÑADA — The mission of the spacecraft Ulysses, which studied the far-flung polar regions of the sun, has come to an end after 18 years of exploration — far outlasting its original life expectancy. The spacecraft was a joint mission between Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA and European Space Agency. Throughout its long mission it entered unexplored regions of the solar system, gathering information about the sun and its environment. “We lasted almost four times longer than planned and a year longer than we thought we would,” said Ed Massey, Ulysses NASA/JPL project manager.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | April 20, 2007
Having lost communication with Mars Global Surveyor late last year, JPL/NASA announced late last week that an internal board has determined the spacecraft was lost due to a series of events triggered after ground control in Denver sent an incorrect computer address. "There was not a single thing that happened," said Fuk Li, Mars exploration program manager at JPL in La Cañada Flintridge. "It was a series of events that caused the problem." MGS was launched in November 1996, and arrived at Mars to begin its mission in September 1997.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | November 17, 2006
Engineers are still attempting to contact the Mars Global Surveyor satellite through various methods utilizing other Mars explorers in a Martian rescue mission. The satellite stop relaying data to Earth just days before its 10th anniversary. "We first lost it on Nov. 2, then got it back on the fifth but lost it again," said Tom Thorpe, MGS project manager from JPL. The orbiter is the oldest of the five NASA spacecraft currently in orbit around Mars. Launched on Nov. 7, 1996 the MGS has operated longer than any other spacecraft that has been sent to the planet.
BUSINESS
By Tracey Laity | April 8, 2006
LA CA—ADA FLINTRIDGE ? Scientists who had jumped for joy as the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter successfully entered its namesake's gravitational field are now carefully monitoring its progress as it begins its slow descent into the planet's atmosphere. The spacecraft, one of the largest and most technologically advanced ever sent to Mars, and the linchpin of a $720-million information-gathering mission, has already gone through four major navigational maneuvers, executed by staff at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
NEWS
September 27, 2010
Robert L. Crabtree was born on September 21, 1926 in Elgin Illinois.  He passed away September 19 th , 2010 at Verdugo Hills Hospital, at the age of 83.  Bob graduated from Crystal Lake High School, served honorably in the U.S. Army Air Corps during WW II, and went on to graduate from Denver University with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering in 1952. He worked as an engineer with Honeywell in Minneapolis, and then moved his family to Southern California in 1960 to work at Pasadena’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for 32 years.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | August 3, 2007
Weather conditions on Earth and Mars are plaguing two Jet Propulsion Laboratory missions. The Phoenix Mars Lander, which had a scheduled launch Friday, has now been postponed to Saturday at 3:02 a.m. PST. The delay is due to severe weather at the Kennedy Space Center, while the rovers Opportunity and Spirit are still battling a severe dust storm on the Martian surface. JPL/NASA announced that Friday's launch of the Phoenix Mars Lander has been postponed 24 hours to 3:02 a.m. PST, Saturday.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
Lauren Masters Residents who want to get bowled over -- literally -- by a Mars rover will get the chance Saturday and Sunday, the only days NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is open to the public this year. Visitors who are less hands-on can watch multimedia presentations or see replicas of spacecraft at this year's open house, "The Spirit of Exploration." "Everyone loves the exhibits," JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said. "It's as much fun for all ages as Disneyland."
NEWS
May 16, 2003
Josh Kleinbaum For the first time in two years, NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab will open its doors to the public, showing off the technology it uses to develop unmanned spacecraft such as the twin Mars Exploration Rovers. The free two-day open house, themed "Journey to the Planets and Beyond," will feature informational displays and interactive activities with a family slant. Children will be able to lie on the ground while a lightweight rover rolls over them, simulating the Mars Exploration Rovers.
NEWS
By Tracey Laity | March 11, 2006
LA CA—ADA FLINTRIDGE ? After nearly 30 minutes of nail-biting silence, staff at Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mission Control erupted into whoops and hollers of joy as the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter came back into radio contact on Friday afternoon. As the spacecraft, one of the largest and most technologically advanced ever to be sent to Mars, briefly disappeared behind the red planet and fell out of radio contact with Earth at 1:46 p.m., the future of the $720-million mission literally hung in the balance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
THE818NOW
December 17, 2012
Space fanatics and NASA obsessives: Clear your afternoon calendar. At approximately 2:28 p.m. Monday, NASA will send its twin spacecrafts Ebb and Flow hurtling into the moon at 3,760 mph -- and the space agency will have a live play-by-play of the event, hosted by scientists in the control room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. The live feed begins at 2 and ends around 2:30. Unfortunately, you will not be able to see the two crashes because the lunar crater that will be their final resting places will be in shadow at the time.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 27, 2010
Robert L. Crabtree was born on September 21, 1926 in Elgin Illinois.  He passed away September 19 th , 2010 at Verdugo Hills Hospital, at the age of 83.  Bob graduated from Crystal Lake High School, served honorably in the U.S. Army Air Corps during WW II, and went on to graduate from Denver University with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering in 1952. He worked as an engineer with Honeywell in Minneapolis, and then moved his family to Southern California in 1960 to work at Pasadena’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for 32 years.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | August 12, 2009
LA CAÑADA ? The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter came back online Monday when Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineers placed it in safe mode after it inexplicably switched from one onboard computer to another. The switch from the A computer to the B computer happened late Thursday night, and engineers have been working since then to determine what made the spacecraft make the swap. It was the first time the computer switch has occurred in the three years that the Mars orbiters has been sending images and data.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 12, 2009
LA CAÑADA — The mission of the spacecraft Ulysses, which studied the far-flung polar regions of the sun, has come to an end after 18 years of exploration — far outlasting its original life expectancy. The spacecraft was a joint mission between Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA and European Space Agency. Throughout its long mission it entered unexplored regions of the solar system, gathering information about the sun and its environment. “We lasted almost four times longer than planned and a year longer than we thought we would,” said Ed Massey, Ulysses NASA/JPL project manager.
LOCAL
By Herbert Molano | June 2, 2008
Astronomers and local politicians may have had the most memorable week in Glendale. Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientists and engineers on May 25 cheered as the three-legged spacecraft, Phoenix, landed on Martian soil with assistance from the gravitational pull of the red planet. The budget deficit, the employee overtime abuse and the campaign reform issues landed Tuesday on the City Council like a three-legged alien spacecraft brought by the gravitational pull of the campaign contribution abuse issue.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | May 30, 2008
The news vans, cameras and reporters are slowly moving out of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory parking lot after a weekend of crossed fingers, lucky peanuts and amazing scientific and engineering achievement. Just before 5 p.m on Sunday, the Phoenix spacecraft used its descent thrusters and landed on its three legs on the Martian surface, all according to plan. The landing procedure was last attempted in 1999 with the Mars Polar Lander but communication was lost with the spacecraft shortly before it entered Mars?
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | August 3, 2007
Weather conditions on Earth and Mars are plaguing two Jet Propulsion Laboratory missions. The Phoenix Mars Lander, which had a scheduled launch Friday, has now been postponed to Saturday at 3:02 a.m. PST. The delay is due to severe weather at the Kennedy Space Center, while the rovers Opportunity and Spirit are still battling a severe dust storm on the Martian surface. JPL/NASA announced that Friday's launch of the Phoenix Mars Lander has been postponed 24 hours to 3:02 a.m. PST, Saturday.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | April 20, 2007
Having lost communication with Mars Global Surveyor late last year, JPL/NASA announced late last week that an internal board has determined the spacecraft was lost due to a series of events triggered after ground control in Denver sent an incorrect computer address. "There was not a single thing that happened," said Fuk Li, Mars exploration program manager at JPL in La Cañada Flintridge. "It was a series of events that caused the problem." MGS was launched in November 1996, and arrived at Mars to begin its mission in September 1997.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | November 17, 2006
Engineers are still attempting to contact the Mars Global Surveyor satellite through various methods utilizing other Mars explorers in a Martian rescue mission. The satellite stop relaying data to Earth just days before its 10th anniversary. "We first lost it on Nov. 2, then got it back on the fifth but lost it again," said Tom Thorpe, MGS project manager from JPL. The orbiter is the oldest of the five NASA spacecraft currently in orbit around Mars. Launched on Nov. 7, 1996 the MGS has operated longer than any other spacecraft that has been sent to the planet.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|