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NEWS
By Dan Kimber | October 8, 2009
I have written before about the accommodations that Glendale schools have put forth to improve the learning environment for our students with special needs. Officially, there is a long-standing record of compliance with state rules and mandates that our district can point to with pride. It can also be proud of the supremely dedicated teachers who work day in and day out with challenges that the rest of us in the profession can only imagine. I am proud to call these people my colleagues because they embody in their teaching, in their exceptional patience, in their tender regard for kids who need extra help, the very best in my profession.
NEWS
By: Ani Amirkhanian | August 31, 2005
When Glendale resident Dolly Villaflor, migrated to the United States after World War II from the Philippines to start a better life, she also felt the need to fulfill some goals. The 85-year-old decided to pursue an education, and enrolled in college where she earned a master's degree in guidance counseling. After being turned down for teaching jobs at public schools, Villaflor found her place teaching students in special education. She taught special-needs children in Los Angeles and Europe.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | June 6, 2013
Moments before Justina Grant and her Tobinworld classmates accepted their high school diplomas on Wednesday, she was already predicting that tears were bound to fall during the ceremony. "A lot of tears are going to be shed [today], I can tell right now," the 17-year-old said. After four years at the school, Justina is looking forward to the future, which was once so uncertain because of the behavioral problems she faced. "From the background I came from, I didn't think I'd make it here to graduate," she said.
THE818NOW
December 28, 2011
Greg Donoghue grew up around film sets. His father worked as a film publicist in Europe and his uncle is Pierre Spengler, a producer of the "Superman" movies. But the 30-year-old had never seriously considered a career in the movie industry until he got a chance to direct his own short-film called "Sunshine Manor," a love story about relationship between a nursing home patient and her doctor. "It takes a lot of patience, and time is your worst enemy," Donoghue said of his directorial debut.
NEWS
By Jo Ann Stupakis | February 28, 2011
Families of special-needs students ages 14 to 21 are invited to a forum from 5:45 to 8:45 p.m. March 22 at the Glendale Civic Auditorium. Foothill Special Education Local Plan Agency (SELPA) is hosting the event, and it includes dinner, a presentation by attorney Carlos M. Gonzalez, and more than 30 agencies will provide information about transition services. Reservations are required. Foothill SELPA coordinates services for special-education and special-needs students in Glendale, Burbank and La Cañada Flintridge.
NEWS
By Kimberlie Zakarian | February 17, 2010
It is a unique existence to deal with a child, or other loved one, with special needs of a physical or psychological nature. Those who care daily for such individuals know the challenges firsthand. The simplest duties, such as getting a child ready for school, can be exhausting. If it is a physical disability, they may have to provide hands-on assistance. If it is psychological or emotional, they may need to use special methods of consoling and reasoning to get this task done. And every other duty during the day may take the same amount of superfluous energy.
NEWS
By Charly Shelton | January 12, 2007
    Descanso Gardens is a beautiful place to come and relax in La Cañada. The gardens are maintained by horticulturalist and professional gardeners. But one special garden, set just outside the complex. is tended not by gardeners, but by students. These horticulturalists-in-training are part of a Harvest Garden outreach program that teams special needs students with volunteers and Descanso employees. Each week they tend to a patch of soil in the Harvest Garden adopted by their class.
NEWS
November 16, 2002
The works of artists Adrian Wong Shue and Peter Shire are on display from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday at the Art Exhibit and Sale benefiting Hillside Learning Center. Shire's metal sculptures are part of the California landscape in the neighborhoods of Elysian Park, the Burbank Empire Center and the MTA Station at Wilshire and Vermont. A donation will be made to Hillside for each piece sold at the event on the campus at 4331 Oak Grove Drive, La Canada Flintridge.
FEATURES
By Ani Amirkhanian | December 27, 2007
For more than 50 years, Jerry Campbell has dedicated his time and energy for the good of the developmentally disabled in the community. The 83-year-old retired mechanical engineer and his wife, Phyllis, are founders of the Glendale Assn. for the Retarded. Since its inception in 1954, the association has served hundreds of adults with special needs between the ages of 20 and 60. Although the organization now has a full-time staff, Campbell continues toto contribute. And he’s not ready to stop any time soon.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert | January 23, 2010
As the “I’m just a bill” School House Rock cartoon ended, Hoover High School teacher Monica Wilke-Lewis began distributing a flow chart with 10 bubbles that represent how laws are made in Congress. Some in the government class of about 20 special-education students were still giggling about the video. Another stared out the window behind his right shoulder. Just like the average classroom, most students were quiet, some attentive, and others a bit sheepish as Wilke-Lewis detailed the legislative process.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 26, 2013
Chris Lougheed, the new principal at Tobinworld in Glendale, didn't have to learn much about the nonpublic school that serves children with special needs and autism. He'd already taught there for 23 years, beginning as a high school teacher when he was just 23 years old. He replaces former principal Chuck Conrad, who announced recently that he was retiring - and who nominated Lougheed for the position. “Chuck did such a great job,” Lougheed said. “I hope I can build on that.” Lougheed realized he wanted to be an educator after working as a camp counselor in college at Camp All Nations for developmentally disabled adults in Wrightwood when he was around 20 years old. When a friend suggested Lougheed serve as a camp counselor, he didn't anticipate what the experience would be like, but soon found himself living in a cabin with 24 disabled adults.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | June 6, 2013
Moments before Justina Grant and her Tobinworld classmates accepted their high school diplomas on Wednesday, she was already predicting that tears were bound to fall during the ceremony. "A lot of tears are going to be shed [today], I can tell right now," the 17-year-old said. After four years at the school, Justina is looking forward to the future, which was once so uncertain because of the behavioral problems she faced. "From the background I came from, I didn't think I'd make it here to graduate," she said.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | April 28, 2012
A group of parents of children with special needs experienced frustration firsthand on Saturday when they were asked to perform a series of exercises designed to test their visual perceptions and thought processes. The word “Red” was printed in blue, and when parents were asked to say the color's name, they shouted “blue.” But they were supposed to say “red.” The exercise was designed to acquaint parents with the frustration and processing difficulties experienced by their special-needs children.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | March 9, 2012
Glendale Unified's special-needs school is set to receive some special attention. In a 4-1 vote, school board members opted this week to proceed with an expansive set of construction plans for College View School. An updated cost estimate for the project hovers at $24.3 million. The physical overhaul of the campus will be among the first capital projects funded by Measure S, a $270-million school bond passed by voters in April 2011. Located on Mountain Street across from Glendale Community College's upper parking lot, College View currently enrolls 75 severely disabled students from Glendale, La Cañada Flintridge and Burbank.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | February 9, 2012
Built in 1977 and passed over amid a wave of bond-funded refurbishment projects three decades later, College View School is now poised for a multimillion-dollar makeover that Glendale Unified officials say will enable the district to better serve its severely disabled students. School board members on Tuesday picked apart four potential construction projects with price tags ranging from $11.6 million to $19.4 million that would dramatically reshape the site. It will be among the first projects funded by Measure S, a $270-million school bond passed by voters in April 2011.
THE818NOW
December 28, 2011
Greg Donoghue grew up around film sets. His father worked as a film publicist in Europe and his uncle is Pierre Spengler, a producer of the "Superman" movies. But the 30-year-old had never seriously considered a career in the movie industry until he got a chance to direct his own short-film called "Sunshine Manor," a love story about relationship between a nursing home patient and her doctor. "It takes a lot of patience, and time is your worst enemy," Donoghue said of his directorial debut.
NEWS
By Jo Ann Stupakis | February 28, 2011
Families of special-needs students ages 14 to 21 are invited to a forum from 5:45 to 8:45 p.m. March 22 at the Glendale Civic Auditorium. Foothill Special Education Local Plan Agency (SELPA) is hosting the event, and it includes dinner, a presentation by attorney Carlos M. Gonzalez, and more than 30 agencies will provide information about transition services. Reservations are required. Foothill SELPA coordinates services for special-education and special-needs students in Glendale, Burbank and La Cañada Flintridge.
NEWS
By Kimberlie Zakarian | February 17, 2010
It is a unique existence to deal with a child, or other loved one, with special needs of a physical or psychological nature. Those who care daily for such individuals know the challenges firsthand. The simplest duties, such as getting a child ready for school, can be exhausting. If it is a physical disability, they may have to provide hands-on assistance. If it is psychological or emotional, they may need to use special methods of consoling and reasoning to get this task done. And every other duty during the day may take the same amount of superfluous energy.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert | January 23, 2010
As the “I’m just a bill” School House Rock cartoon ended, Hoover High School teacher Monica Wilke-Lewis began distributing a flow chart with 10 bubbles that represent how laws are made in Congress. Some in the government class of about 20 special-education students were still giggling about the video. Another stared out the window behind his right shoulder. Just like the average classroom, most students were quiet, some attentive, and others a bit sheepish as Wilke-Lewis detailed the legislative process.
NEWS
By Dan Kimber | October 8, 2009
I have written before about the accommodations that Glendale schools have put forth to improve the learning environment for our students with special needs. Officially, there is a long-standing record of compliance with state rules and mandates that our district can point to with pride. It can also be proud of the supremely dedicated teachers who work day in and day out with challenges that the rest of us in the profession can only imagine. I am proud to call these people my colleagues because they embody in their teaching, in their exceptional patience, in their tender regard for kids who need extra help, the very best in my profession.
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