Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsSupreme Court
IN THE NEWS

Supreme Court

FEATURED ARTICLES
THE818NOW
June 28, 2012
WASHINGTON -- Just before 10 a.m. EDT today, the nine justices of the Supreme Court will be summoned by a buzzer to the robing room behind the court bench. No matter how acrimonious the fight over the healthcare decision they are about to announce, tradition calls for them to shake hands with one another. Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller began that little ceremony in the late 1800s to note that differences of opinion do not preclude the justices' overall harmony of purpose. That sense of harmony may be short-lived if the court is badly split on what may be the most significant ruling on an act of Congress in more than half a century.
NEWS
November 24, 2001
Amber Willard GLENDALE -- Prosecutors will meet next week to decide how to proceed after the state Supreme Court rejected indictments filed against three teens accused in the stabbing death of Raul Aguirre. Aguirre, a 17-year-old senior at Hoover High School, was stabbed to death on May 5, 2000, while trying to intervene in what police have called a gang fight. Three teens -- Karen Terteryan, Rafael Gevorgyan and Anait Msryan -- were arrested hours after Aguirre died and have been held on bail since.
NEWS
By By Lauren Hilgers | January 25, 2006
DOWNTOWN -- U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer made a stop in Burbank on Tuesday, announcing her opposition to Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito. Even as Boxer spoke in the Burbank City Council Chambers, Alito's nomination was being sent from the Senate Judiciary Committee to the full Senate. His nomination was passed on a 10 to 8 vote split along party lines. "I think it's appropriate that Sen. Boxer was here on election day," said Paul Krekorian, president of Burbank Unified School District's Board of Education, who attended the news conference.
NEWS
February 15, 2002
Gretchen Hoffman LA CRESCENTA -- Almost two years ago, Sharon Wilson's estranged husband gouged the floors, punched holes in the walls and piled flammable material on all the vents of their La Crescenta home. Two days later, he came back, doused everything with gasoline and burned the house to the ground. Patrick Wilson was convicted of aggravated arson and sentenced to five years in jail, but his wife -- their divorce isn't final -- has been told he could be out of jail as early as April.
NEWS
May 16, 2002
Mr. Steel notes that the Supreme Court ruled that the internment of U.S. citizens because of their ethnicity was constitutional. Does constitutionality make it right? I think not. The Supreme Court once found slavery and segregation constitutional. This only points out that the Constitution does not necessarily uphold morality. The Constitution's meaning is still argued every year before the Supreme Court. The Constitution allows for pragmatic rationalizations in the context of time and situation.
NEWS
August 24, 2001
Re: "Supreme Court's role is to interpret the law": While Charles Unger, in "Counselor's Corner" (Community Forum, Aug. 17), has correctly analyzed the legal and political ramifications of Atwater, his conclusion that the Supreme Court failed to protect citizens is wrong. The role of the Supreme Court was defined almost 200 years ago in Marbury v. Madison, and it remains unchallenged so far. In Marbury, the Marshall Court said, "It is emphatically the province and duty of the judiciary department to say what the law is."
NEWS
August 31, 2000
The comments in the Aug. 22 News-Press by two of Glendale's civic leaders were troubling. Councilwoman Ginger Bremberg declares the recommendation of a committee of the Human Relations Coalition "reprehensible" for taking a stance against bigotry. She further characterizes discrimination as an issue that does not matter. Coalition member Larry Zarian opposes public money being given to groups that discriminate, but somehow doesn't appear to think discrimination against homosexuals matters.
NEWS
September 1, 2001
Amber Willard LOS ANGELES -- Prosecutors were working Friday to prepare their request to the state's Supreme Court for review of the case against three teens accused of killing a Glendale boy more than a year ago. An appellate court sided with defense attorneys last month, tossing the grand jury indictments against Karen Terteryan, Rafael Gevorgyan and Anait Msryan, who are accused in the stabbing death of Raul Aguirre...
NEWS
May 3, 2002
Ron Ruppe's letter to the editor (April 30) demonstrates why one should actually take the time to read a legal decision before making blanket statements that demonstrate complete ignorance of what the Supreme Court has ruled. His letter claims the court's decision "allows the state to ban development on privately owned land in the Tahoe area for environmental reasons and offer no compensation to the land owners." It does no such thing. The Tahoe decision relates only to temporary moratoriums placed on property owners by local and state governments.
LOCAL
By Riley Harris | October 9, 2008
I saw the first TV ads for Proposition 8. I was taken aback by the sheer falsehoods of the claims made about the consequences if this doesn’t pass. The first is that clergy can be sued for refusing to officiate a same-sex marriage. Well, in the four years that Massachusetts has recognized same-sex marriages, there have been no such lawsuits — because the state dictating how clergy can officiate religious ceremonies is in direct violation of the 1st Amendment. (For example, the Catholic Church has never been forced to perform a marriage for a non-Catholic or civilly divorced couple.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | June 26, 2013
U.S. Supreme Court rulings on Wednesday that struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act and reopened the door to gay marriage in California provoked mixed reactions among area religious leaders. Some who have already embraced same-sex unions - Pastor Amy Pringle of St. George's Episcopal Church in La Cañada Flintridge and Pastor Bill Thomas of Burbank's Little White Chapel - said the decision helps them fulfill a mission to treat all parishioners equally. But for conservative clergy like Pastor Bryan Griem of Montrose Community Church and Pastor Jon Barta of Valley Baptist Church in Burbank, the high court rulings represent a challenge of core religious beliefs.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Adam Schiff | September 21, 2012
Three months ago, in a decision all but lost in the tumult over the Supreme Court's ruling on the Affordable Care Act, the justices overturned a century-old Montana law that prohibited corporate spending in that state's elections. In the Montana case, the Supreme Court had the chance to revisit its deeply flawed 2010 decision in Citizens United. But despite the urgings of members of the court itself and a public shell-shocked by the recent torrent of unregulated corporate expenditures, the court chose instead to double down and reaffirm the conclusion of Citizens United that corporations are people, at least as far as the First Amendment is concerned.
THE818NOW
June 28, 2012
WASHINGTON -- Just before 10 a.m. EDT today, the nine justices of the Supreme Court will be summoned by a buzzer to the robing room behind the court bench. No matter how acrimonious the fight over the healthcare decision they are about to announce, tradition calls for them to shake hands with one another. Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller began that little ceremony in the late 1800s to note that differences of opinion do not preclude the justices' overall harmony of purpose. That sense of harmony may be short-lived if the court is badly split on what may be the most significant ruling on an act of Congress in more than half a century.
NEWS
June 28, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Courtupheld the constitutionality of President Obama's healthcare law Thursday, ruling the government may impose tax penalties on persons who do not have health insurance. The court's long-awaited ruling rejected a broad legal attack on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act brought by Republican state officials and the National Federation of Independent Business. The legal challenge focused on the law's so-called mandate that all must have insurance by 2014 or pay a tax penalty.
NEWS
By Jason Wells, jason.wells@latimes.com | June 28, 2012
Among the area's congressional representatives, reaction to the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling Thursday on President Obama's healthcare overhaul were diametrically opposed, mirroring their respective parties and the dialogue on Capitol Hill. On one side, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank), who called the 5-4 vote to uphold Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - including the mandate that nearly all Americans have insurance by 2014 or pay a tax penalty - “the correct legal decision.” He also praised conservative Chief Justice John G. Roberts, who wrote the opinion for the majority and joined his more liberal colleagues on the bench to uphold the healthcare law. By doing so, Schiff said, Roberts “chose a different legacy,” and avoided becoming part of a partisan institution - something that was “enormously important to maintaining the independence and reputation of the court.” Rep. Brad Sherman (D-San Fernando Valley)
NEWS
June 28, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) today called the U.S. Supreme Court's vote to uphold President Obama's healthcare law "the correct legal decision," contending that the "hard-passed" reforms would benefit millions of people across the nation. In a statement released shortly after the ruling was made public, Schiff said he was “very pleased” with the court's decision to uphold Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act -- the most contentious issue being the so-called mandate that all must have insurance by 2014 or pay a tax penalty.
NEWS
March 26, 2012
As the U.S. Supreme Courttackles the controversial federal law that overhauled health care, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) today issued a statement calling for live broadcast streaming of the proceedings. The High Court declined to allow live streaming from inside the courtroom, but due to strong public interest, justices agreed to release same-day audio recordings of the arguments. In his statement, Schiff said the public should be able to tune in for the proceedings just as they could on C-SPAN for legislative debates, calling the audio tapes "a poor substitute.
NEWS
February 24, 2012
Glendale officials plan to revisit a city ordinance limiting sidewalk solicitations after the U.S. Supreme Court this week rejected Redondo Beach's bid to revive regulations on where day laborers can solicit work from passing drivers. In 2010, Glendale officials postponed revisions to its own law, which is less restrictive than  Redondo Beach regulations, as they waited for the higher court decision. With that out of the way, Glendale City Atty. Mike Garcia said his office would reviewing the city's ordinance "more closely to see if additional refinements to our ordinance are necessary.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
The California Supreme Court has decided to review whether cities and counties may ban medical marijuana stores. Meeting in closed session, the court Wednesday agreed to assess rulings by lower courts on how much oversight local governments may exert on medical marijuana operations. A ruling is probably a year or two away at least. The court's decision to review the appeals court decisions means they cannot be enforced pending a ruling by the state high court. Continue reading > > RELATED: Glendale officially bans marijuana dispensaries -- Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times Photo: Marijuana being grown.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|