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Teacher Training

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NEWS
July 27, 2002
The school board approved an agreement with Azusa Pacific University on Tuesday that will provide university students with teacher-training opportunities at Glendale schools. The agreement states that the university will pay the district $200 for each full-time teacher at the secondary level. The university will pay the district a rate of $100 for each nine-week assignment for full-time student teachers at the elementary and intermediate level. The California Education Code authorizes school districts to work with California State Universities and Colleges, the University of California system or any other university or college in providing teacher education.
NEWS
August 30, 2003
school year The Glendale Unified School District will begin its fall semester of the 2003-04 school year next week. The district's middle schools and high schools will begin classes on Wednesday. Students enrolled in the district's 11 tra- ditional-schedule elementary schools will begin classes on Thursday. Students will be in school on full-day schedules on Wednesday and Thursday. Starting dates differ this year because of teacher training activities, according to district reports.
NEWS
August 19, 2002
Sen. Scott's school bill signed into law GLENDALE -- A bill sponsored by state Sen. Jack Scott (D-Glendale) that aims to streamline the process of obtaining a school administrator credential has been signed into law by Gov. Gray Davis. The bill, which becomes effective immediately, allows administrators applying for a credential to take a comprehensive written exam rather than complete required university course work. The change allows school districts and county offices to offer their own administrator training problems in lieu of mandated formal graduate studies.
NEWS
October 21, 2002
Gary Moskowitz School district officials were, to a certain extent, guessing when they established a $226-million operating budget for the 2002-03 school year. By anticipating 2002 cutbacks more than a year ago, that guessing game has enabled the district to stay ahead of the game by making cuts along the way, which has enabled schools to hold on to programs like K-3 class-size reduction and avoid layoffs. But the guessing game is not over.
NEWS
May 4, 2004
Gary Moskowitz The Glendale school board is expected to vote today to approve as many as 31 emergency permits for teachers next year. The emergency permits would allow fully credentialed teachers to teach a class that falls outside of their subject credential because no other teachers are available or no other credentialing authorization is available. Each year, the Glendale Unified School District applies for emergency permits because schools -- typically middle and high schools -- need to offer extra sections of classes but not enough to justify hiring a full-time teacher, said Cathy McMullen, assistant superintendent of human resources for the district.
NEWS
December 4, 2001
Alecia Foster NORTHEAST GLENDALE -- Glendale Community College may have escaped Gov. Gray Davis' proposed state budget cuts. After laying out a plan that would zap $834 million from the state's K-12 educational system, Davis proposed cutting only about $5 million from community colleges. "We were hit less than anyone else," said Larry Serot, vice president of administrative services at GCC. He was not aware if any of that money, allocated for teacher training, would have gone to GCC. It would not affect the college if the cuts were approved as is anyway, because the money had not yet been given to the colleges.
NEWS
April 25, 2002
Gary Moskowitz GLENDALE -- Glendale Unified has joined educators throughout the state in the debate over Assembly Bill 2160. The bill was passed by the Assembly Education Committee Wednesday and moves to the Appropriations Committee in May. Assembly Bill 2160 would change the ways decisions are made between teachers and school boards. Existing law says teachers unions can bargain over wages, hours of employment and other conditions of employment.
NEWS
October 16, 2003
Girl Scouts hold pet fair LA CANADA FLINTRIDGE -- La Canada Flintridge Girl Scout Troops 95 and 134 will hold a pet fair 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Memorial Park, 1301 Foothill Blvd. The event will assist the Burbank-based Paw'd Squad, a nonprofit animal-rescue group, and help the troops achieve their Silver Award. The event will feature a pet adoption booth, game booths, raffles, a pet trainer who will answer questions and a pet talent contest.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | May 2, 2007
GLENDALE — Sometimes teachers are absent from school, too. Now the out-dated way Glendale Unified School District assigns substitute teachers to those classrooms without an instructor is slated for a technological makeover. District staff members presented the results of a nearly 10-month-long study Tuesday aimed at upgrading the system, which has for years been coordinated mostly by a single district employee. Nancy McNair checked the number of teacher absences and made the round of calls to fill those teacher-less classrooms with an instructor.
NEWS
By Vince Lovato | April 4, 2006
GLENDALE ? A dozen teachers at Rosemont Middle School have been using a $410,000 grant to help students learn to improve their writing with the use of technology. On Wednesday, parents for the first time had a chance to check out how during an open house. Students use laptop computers to write assigned essays then submit them to their personal accounts on the www.gomyaccess.com website. A Rosemont teacher, with help from a computerized grading rubric on the website, evaluate the work.
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NEWS
By Max Zimbert | May 25, 2010
GLENDALE — School district officials are finalizing summer workshops to prepare primary-grade teachers for class sizes that could grow to include up to 30 students next year, officials said. Workshops are intended to help kindergarten through third-grade teachers maximize classroom organization and management, an increasingly vital skill as classes swell by as many as 10 additional students. "We're hoping with a strong foundation in the basics of organization, it will allow them to focus their time more on the actual teaching," said Kristine Siegal, who coordinates professional development for Glendale Unified School District.
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NEWS
By Dan Kimber | March 11, 2010
I am at a complete loss to understand the educational priorities of my state and, to a lesser degree but closer to home, Glendale Unified School District. While we are in the midst of unprecedented reductions in school funding throughout the state, while we are furloughing teachers and subtracting days that our children are taught, while we are cutting back on health care for teachers and their families and increasing class size in kindergarten through 12th grade, while we fire some of the youngest and brightest teachers and entice some of the most experienced into early retirement — all of this in the name of saving money — we are simultaneously, inexplicably complacent about hundreds of millions of tax dollars being sent down a bureaucratic sinkhole in the name of “teacher training.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | May 2, 2007
GLENDALE — Sometimes teachers are absent from school, too. Now the out-dated way Glendale Unified School District assigns substitute teachers to those classrooms without an instructor is slated for a technological makeover. District staff members presented the results of a nearly 10-month-long study Tuesday aimed at upgrading the system, which has for years been coordinated mostly by a single district employee. Nancy McNair checked the number of teacher absences and made the round of calls to fill those teacher-less classrooms with an instructor.
NEWS
By Vince Lovato | April 4, 2006
GLENDALE ? A dozen teachers at Rosemont Middle School have been using a $410,000 grant to help students learn to improve their writing with the use of technology. On Wednesday, parents for the first time had a chance to check out how during an open house. Students use laptop computers to write assigned essays then submit them to their personal accounts on the www.gomyaccess.com website. A Rosemont teacher, with help from a computerized grading rubric on the website, evaluate the work.
NEWS
May 4, 2004
Gary Moskowitz The Glendale school board is expected to vote today to approve as many as 31 emergency permits for teachers next year. The emergency permits would allow fully credentialed teachers to teach a class that falls outside of their subject credential because no other teachers are available or no other credentialing authorization is available. Each year, the Glendale Unified School District applies for emergency permits because schools -- typically middle and high schools -- need to offer extra sections of classes but not enough to justify hiring a full-time teacher, said Cathy McMullen, assistant superintendent of human resources for the district.
NEWS
October 17, 2003
Gary Moskowitz Cerritos Elementary School Principal Janice Hanada knows firsthand what it's like to be a confused parent. She admits that keeping up with her daughter's seventh-grade curriculum requirements is difficult and often confusing. She and Cerritos faculty, knowing how difficult school expectations can be to understand, have put parents at the forefront of their schoolwide plan for improvement on the Academic Performance Index. "I'm an educator and a parent, and I know it's difficult to grasp everything that students need to learn," Hanada said.
NEWS
October 16, 2003
Girl Scouts hold pet fair LA CANADA FLINTRIDGE -- La Canada Flintridge Girl Scout Troops 95 and 134 will hold a pet fair 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Memorial Park, 1301 Foothill Blvd. The event will assist the Burbank-based Paw'd Squad, a nonprofit animal-rescue group, and help the troops achieve their Silver Award. The event will feature a pet adoption booth, game booths, raffles, a pet trainer who will answer questions and a pet talent contest.
NEWS
August 30, 2003
school year The Glendale Unified School District will begin its fall semester of the 2003-04 school year next week. The district's middle schools and high schools will begin classes on Wednesday. Students enrolled in the district's 11 tra- ditional-schedule elementary schools will begin classes on Thursday. Students will be in school on full-day schedules on Wednesday and Thursday. Starting dates differ this year because of teacher training activities, according to district reports.
NEWS
October 21, 2002
Gary Moskowitz School district officials were, to a certain extent, guessing when they established a $226-million operating budget for the 2002-03 school year. By anticipating 2002 cutbacks more than a year ago, that guessing game has enabled the district to stay ahead of the game by making cuts along the way, which has enabled schools to hold on to programs like K-3 class-size reduction and avoid layoffs. But the guessing game is not over.
NEWS
August 19, 2002
Sen. Scott's school bill signed into law GLENDALE -- A bill sponsored by state Sen. Jack Scott (D-Glendale) that aims to streamline the process of obtaining a school administrator credential has been signed into law by Gov. Gray Davis. The bill, which becomes effective immediately, allows administrators applying for a credential to take a comprehensive written exam rather than complete required university course work. The change allows school districts and county offices to offer their own administrator training problems in lieu of mandated formal graduate studies.
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