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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | October 15, 2013
Hoover High School held a reception for 40 students from a small French town on Monday.  The exchange students from Bellegarde, which has only 12,000 residents, will spend two weeks attending Hoover. Many of the students expressed amazement at the size of the Los Angeles area and its massive skyscrapers. For most of the French exchange students, their visit signifies their first time seeing America, or even traveling by airplane, said one of their teachers, Celine Gaucher. “Everything is big,” said 17-year-old Thibaud Soulier, speaking of the first American city he has ever seen.
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NEWS
October 14, 2013
The decades-long tradition of students competing in tug-of-war games at Wilson Middle School continued Friday in a rite that helped mark the end of the first quarter of the school year. Sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders played the game against fellow students before taking on their teachers on the school's field. Staff members and teachers newest to Wilson Middle School must take a spot on the rope closest to the mud puddle that staff members create days in advance by digging out a hole in the field and filling it with water.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | October 10, 2013
The Glendale Unified school district is gearing up to spend about $760,000 on computers for more than 650 educators in the last phase of a major initiative to equip teachers with laptops using funds from the $270-million Measure S bond that voters passed in 2011 . About 700 teachers have received new Mac and PC laptops since 2012, when the school district began rolling them out to teachers. As of mid-September, teachers had requested more than 660 laptops at Hoover High School, Edison Elementary, Lincoln Elementary and Verdugo Woodlands Elementary.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
In “Glendale teachers prepare for Common Core standards,” Sept. 21, it was mentioned that the new Common Core standards are slowly and efficiently being implemented in Glendale schools and that teachers are teaching the new material to other teachers. It was also mentioned that students are being transitioned into the new standards through tests proctored through computers. I believe that the methods used for transitioning both teachers and students into Common Core from the old standards are effective, however I cannot fully agree on the testing method used on children.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | September 20, 2013
Educators in Glendale said are studying and training one another on the new Common Core standards set to be implemented by 2016, replacing standards California adopted in 1997. Fifty-one classroom teachers from Glendale's 30 schools are now helping to train their colleagues on Common Core skills, which encourage critical thinking from students as they analyze non-literary texts and in-depth math problem-solving skills. The 51 have already trained 260 Glendale teachers on the new English language curriculum, which aims to make students literate across a wide range of subjects from the technical to the historical.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | September 18, 2013
Glendale Unified will not apply for federal Race to the Top funds - a potential $30 million payout - a decision that avoids a confrontation with the district's teachers union regarding the use of test scores that scuttled the highly-sought grant application last year. Supt. Dick Sheehan announced that the district had bowed out of the race during Tuesday's board meeting, with 16 days remaining until the application would have been due. With tens of millions of grant dollars to potentially secure, the district planned to use the money to establish robotics labs at all four middle schools, hire additional counselors and fund after-school enrichment classes for high school students.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | September 5, 2013
Glendale Teachers Assn. officials, in talks with the district regarding its support for federal Race to the Top funds , said they remain concerned regarding testing requirements and funding implications - issues that scuttled Glendale Unified's chances for the multi-million bounty last year. In order to contend for the Race to the Top grants, the district must submit an application to the U.S. Department of Education by Oct. 3 bearing the signatures of school board President Nayiri Nahabedian, Glendale Supt.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com and By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 24, 2013
Glendale teachers will not face any furlough days during the current school year under a tentative agreement reached this week. The agreement, reached Aug. 22, between Glendale Unified officials and the Glendale Teachers Assn. leadership, must still be ratified by the school board and teachers, respectively. School officials had scheduled one unpaid furlough day for the 2013-14 school year, amounting to $650,000 in savings. During the past six years, Glendale Unified has made millions in budget cuts, a response to years of decreasing state educational funding.
NEWS
August 23, 2013
In the hope of encouraging school districts across the nation to come up with innovative reforms that will boost student achievement and teacher effectiveness, the U.S. Department of Education is again this year offering Race to the Top grants. The department has a big pot of money to work with and Glendale Unified officials are again seeking grant funding of up to $30 million. Last year the GUSD made a valiant attempt - in the form of a 503-page document - to secure such a grant, which was at the time worth up to $40 million.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 17, 2013
Glendale Unified officials have renewed hope that the district can win a federal grant worth up to $30 million following the district's failed attempt to win the grant last year because it lacked support from the Glendale Teachers Assn. In 2012, the district prepared to contend for a Race to the Top grant, then worth up to $40 million. With the extra funding, school officials had planned to hire more intervention teachers and curriculum specialists as well as pay for expansion of programs such as robotics.
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