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NEWS
May 16, 2013
Planet-hunting scientists were dealt a major blow Wednesday when NASA officials announced that a crucial wheel on the Kepler space telescope had ceased to function and that the craft had been placed in safe mode. Even as NASA officials raised the possibility that they could get the telescope back up and running, scientists began mourning the potential loss of a spacecraft that they said had fundamentally altered our understanding of alien planets in the Milky Way - and Earth's place in an increasingly crowded galaxy.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | August 8, 2009
Only at Caltech and Jet Propulsion Laboratory would minus-406 degrees Fahrenheit be called a warming process, but so it was with salvaging the frozen Spitzer space telescope. After the telescope, launched in 2003, recently ran out of coolant, the instrument was all but used up until scientists worked around the problem, giving the image taker another shot at exploration. While the space telescope?s functions have been drastically reduced, NASA has approved a second mission for Spitzer during its so-called warm phase.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | July 20, 2007
Several JPL projects got a vote of confidence recently from the House Appropriation Committee when it passed a bill that included funding for projects managed by the La Cañada facility. "It is no secret that we have in our region one of the world's premier science institutes," Congressman Adam Schiff said of his continued support of JPL. Schiff was recently appointed to serve on the House Appropriation Committee. The bill's total funding is $1.6 billion to $1.65 billion with $1.5 billion coming from the Commerce, Justice and Science Subcommittee, which Schiff is a member.
NEWS
By Sara Cardine | February 13, 2010
On any given night, youths at the Amani Children’s Home in Moshi, Tanzania, can look up and see the moon and stars, but that’s as close as most will ever come to understanding the universe and its scientific wonders. Many of them have never been to school, let alone learned about the planets or space exploration. So when Paulo Younse, a robotics engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, visited the orphanage in January, he took the universe to them. Younse set off Dec. 30 on a three-week African excursion, which included a climb to the frigid peaks of Mt. Kilimanjaro, a four-day safari in the Serengeti and swimming with dolphins in Zanzibar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | June 17, 2009
Bob Alborzian is giving novice astronomers a glimpse of a whole new world through his Sidewalk Astronomers group. The 64-year-old Burbank resident conducts stargazing events once a month at the Chandler Bikeway at Chandler Boulevard and Lima Street. Members bring out their telescopes, and the public can take a peek at the moon, stars, Venus and other planets — if the skies are clear. “We always emphasize ‘weather permitting,’” Alborzian said. “It all depends on whatever the exterior decorator has planned.
LOCAL
By Robin Goldsworthy | July 3, 2009
The sky was the limit for about 30 local residents who ventured to Mount Wilson Observatory on Sunday morning. The excursion, sponsored by the Historical Society of the Crescenta Valley, was an opportunity for the group to learn more about the site and the telescopes housed there. These include the 100-inch Hooker telescope, completed in 1917 and the largest telescope until the activation of the Palomar telescope in 1949. The tour also highlighted the history of Mount Wilson and the observatory, land that is owned by the U.S. Forest Service and run by the Mount Wilson Institute.
NEWS
December 9, 2005
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is bringing new light -- infrared light -- to the study of our dark and mysterious universe. Some of the observatory's most exciting discoveries will be discussed in a free public lecture today, Dec. 9. Michael Werner, project scientist for Spitzer at JPL, will present, "The Spitzer Space Telescope: Exploring the Infrared Universe," at 7 p.m. Today's lecture will be at Pasadena City College's Vosloh Forum. Spitzer, which was launched on Aug. 25, 2003, from Cape Canaveral, Fla., uses infrared, or "heat-sensing" detectors to gaze into space at dusty objects that are difficult to study using visible or other types of light.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | April 20, 2007
The search of life beyond Earth has filled the imagination of humans for centuries. The question of "Are we alone?" has inspired science fiction writers and scientists. The problem has been how to see those Earth-like planets that are so distant. It has been a Catch 22 situation: To find a twin to planet Earth it must be close to a twin Sun, however proximity to such a bright object blurs the vision of telescopes. That is until recently, when two JPL researchers began working on a new type of telescope.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | July 8, 2011
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) this week said he plans to go to battle for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge and the nation’s space program after seeing NASA’s budget trimmed by the House Commerce, Justice and Science Committee. “The proposed appropriations bill for NASA makes dramatic cuts to space technology research and development and other vital efforts,” Schiff, a member of the committee, said. “I’m going to move to try to restore those funds next week.” The committee budgeted $16.8 billion for NASA, $1.6 billion less than last year and $1.9 billion less than what President Obama requested.
NEWS
February 15, 2005
Darleene Barrientos Balboa Elementary School's students were recently star-struck, but their fascination wasn't with hip celebrities. They were enthralled by the view through a telescope. "Wow, my God," 6-year-old Monica Petrossian said while viewing the sun through the telescope. "Isn't it cool?" her docent, 9-year-old Arsine Hakobyan, asked. "Yeah! So, so cool!" Monica said. Balboa students learned about the solar system this month in a program by astronomer Tom Dorff, of Lights in the Sky, which promotes learning about astronomy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 16, 2013
Planet-hunting scientists were dealt a major blow Wednesday when NASA officials announced that a crucial wheel on the Kepler space telescope had ceased to function and that the craft had been placed in safe mode. Even as NASA officials raised the possibility that they could get the telescope back up and running, scientists began mourning the potential loss of a spacecraft that they said had fundamentally altered our understanding of alien planets in the Milky Way - and Earth's place in an increasingly crowded galaxy.
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NEWS
By Sara Cardine | February 13, 2010
On any given night, youths at the Amani Children’s Home in Moshi, Tanzania, can look up and see the moon and stars, but that’s as close as most will ever come to understanding the universe and its scientific wonders. Many of them have never been to school, let alone learned about the planets or space exploration. So when Paulo Younse, a robotics engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, visited the orphanage in January, he took the universe to them. Younse set off Dec. 30 on a three-week African excursion, which included a climb to the frigid peaks of Mt. Kilimanjaro, a four-day safari in the Serengeti and swimming with dolphins in Zanzibar.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | August 8, 2009
Only at Caltech and Jet Propulsion Laboratory would minus-406 degrees Fahrenheit be called a warming process, but so it was with salvaging the frozen Spitzer space telescope. After the telescope, launched in 2003, recently ran out of coolant, the instrument was all but used up until scientists worked around the problem, giving the image taker another shot at exploration. While the space telescope?s functions have been drastically reduced, NASA has approved a second mission for Spitzer during its so-called warm phase.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | June 17, 2009
Bob Alborzian is giving novice astronomers a glimpse of a whole new world through his Sidewalk Astronomers group. The 64-year-old Burbank resident conducts stargazing events once a month at the Chandler Bikeway at Chandler Boulevard and Lima Street. Members bring out their telescopes, and the public can take a peek at the moon, stars, Venus and other planets — if the skies are clear. “We always emphasize ‘weather permitting,’” Alborzian said. “It all depends on whatever the exterior decorator has planned.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | July 20, 2007
Several JPL projects got a vote of confidence recently from the House Appropriation Committee when it passed a bill that included funding for projects managed by the La Cañada facility. "It is no secret that we have in our region one of the world's premier science institutes," Congressman Adam Schiff said of his continued support of JPL. Schiff was recently appointed to serve on the House Appropriation Committee. The bill's total funding is $1.6 billion to $1.65 billion with $1.5 billion coming from the Commerce, Justice and Science Subcommittee, which Schiff is a member.
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