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By Katherine Yamada | October 4, 2011
The candy and tobacco store that opened in the city's main post office in the late 1940s was part of a nationwide movement to provide work for persons living with a disability. In 1947, Postmaster Max L. Green, with assistance from the state and federal governments and the Lions clubs of the area, installed and outfitted a candy and tobacco stand in the post office's lobby. It was operated by Eldon Littell. Green turned the keys of the fully-stocked stand over to Littell, a member of the Foothill Service Club for the Blind, in an informal ceremony that included Mayor Albert C. Lane and Ray Barker, chair of the Foothill Council for the Blind.
NEWS
May 31, 2002
Karen S. Kim GLENDALE -- A bill by Assemblyman Dario Frommer (D-Glendale) that would require age verification for tobacco purchases made over the Internet has been passed by the Assembly with a 52-17 vote. Frommer introduced the bill after his staff successfully purchased tobacco over the Internet using the name of a 2-year-old girl. No age verification was required, Frommer said. "More and more kids are using the Internet to get around the ban on purchasing cigarettes," Frommer said in a statement.
NEWS
August 30, 2002
Legislation that would crack down on people selling cigarettes to children over the Internet won support from both houses of Congress with a 51-15 vote. The bill now requires the approval of Gov. Gray Davis. Introduced by Assemblyman Dario Frommer (D-Glendale), AB 1830 would prohibit sales of tobacco products online without age verification. "More and more kids are using the Internet to purchase cigarettes," Frommer said in a press release.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
The city of Glendale clamped down on tobacco late last month , banning smoking in all new apartments and condominiums. Bert Ring gives his thoughts.  -- Dan Evans, Times Community News 
NEWS
June 26, 2010
Anyone who thought our city didn't need some sort of smoking intervention were proven wrong this week when public health officials released 2007 figures that put us near the high-end of reported tobacco use. In 2007, the adult smoking rate was in the 15% to 16% range, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. It was the last survey before city officials started implementing broad anti-smoking measures meant to limit the public's exposure to second-hand smoke.
NEWS
June 18, 2005
Robert Chacon and Deborah Meron Federal agents raided two businesses and one storage shed Thursday, seizing hundreds of cases of cigarettes that were allegedly being sold illegally. Agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives served three search warrants before confiscating 266 cases of cigarettes, sheets of counterfeit tax stamps -- used to indicate taxes were paid on the cigarettes -- and a vehicle. Three members of the ring were arrested in Raleigh, N.C., where the cigarettes were purchased, Special Agent in Charge Mike Bukovac said.
NEWS
August 2, 2000
Your June 26 editorial about Senate Bill 2070 is irresponsible and misinformed, blindly repeating the tobacco lobbyists' lies. Fire safety standards for cigarettes will substantially reduce residential fire deaths, while costing consumers nothing and the state next to nothing. In addition to preventing hundreds of deaths, fire-safe cigarettes will prevent millions of dollars in property damage, lost productivity and disability. Your assertion that fire-safe cigarettes will cause people indiscriminately to toss their lighted cigarettes out their car windows is as absurd as the claims are equally baseless.
LOCAL
By Max Zimbert | April 29, 2010
A Glendale resident who was convicted of cigarette fraud and tax evasion in April 2008 was sentenced Wednesday to more than seven years in a federal prison. Between January 2002 and June 2005, Avedis Djeredjian, now 41, bought more than 367,960 cartons of cigarettes from North Carolina without adequate tax stamps from California regulators, depriving California of $3.2 million in tax revenue, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. U.S. District Court Judge George King also ordered Djeredjian to pay back more than $6.4 million.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
As a resident of Glendale for many years I have to express my disappointment for what is going to be a new law on smoking (“City may toughen smoking rules,” May 16) proposed by the City Council. It would create an atmosphere of hostility, and possible retaliation would arise that could even lead to harm if not prevented. Imagine two neighbors, one suing the other, and then they have to live peacefully afterward. That is not a good thought. There are so many smokers in Glendale.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | August 5, 2005
Richard Horian, president of Newport Beach's Woodleaf Corp., has been a smoker for a quarter of a century, and though he has not kicked the habit, he no longer lights up. Through Woodleaf, Horian is marketing Aeros Smokeless Cigarettes. He said he developed the devices over an eight-year period "with the help of a lot of scientists and engineers." At the peak of his habit, Horian said he was a two-pack-a-day smoker. And even with quitting techniques such as acupuncture, hypnosis and prescription drugs, he could not give up smoking without going through intense withdrawal patterns.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 4, 2013
After securing a grant worth more than $700,000 earlier this year, the Glendale Unified school district has agreed to allot a portion of those funds to pay for animation workshops that will teach students how to make public service announcements that warn against using tobacco. The California Dept. of Education awarded Glendale Unified $706,644 in July to implement its tobacco-use prevention education program for students in the sixth through 12th grades over the next three years. More than $70,000 has already been allocated for NW4 Kids, an organization that will provide workshops and lessons to teach students how to use animation and create 30-second spots that convey anti-tobacco messages.
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NEWS
June 3, 2013
The city of Glendale clamped down on tobacco late last month , banning smoking in all new apartments and condominiums. Bert Ring gives his thoughts.  -- Dan Evans, Times Community News 
NEWS
May 24, 2013
As a resident of Glendale for many years I have to express my disappointment for what is going to be a new law on smoking (“City may toughen smoking rules,” May 16) proposed by the City Council. It would create an atmosphere of hostility, and possible retaliation would arise that could even lead to harm if not prevented. Imagine two neighbors, one suing the other, and then they have to live peacefully afterward. That is not a good thought. There are so many smokers in Glendale.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | June 27, 2012
Police on Tuesday seized 771 cartons of untaxed or illegal cigarettes - some of which were tucked behind mirrored compartments - at three Glendale tobacco shops. More than 200 untaxed and illegal cigarette cartons were found hidden in a remote-controlled, mirrored compartment at Palmer Gifts on the 1000 block of East Palmer Avenue, Glendale Police Sgt. Manny Fernandez said. Several hundred more cartons were also discovered hidden in a cubbyhole behind a mirror at Cigarette Zone on the 1200 block of South Glendale Avenue, he added.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | October 4, 2011
The candy and tobacco store that opened in the city's main post office in the late 1940s was part of a nationwide movement to provide work for persons living with a disability. In 1947, Postmaster Max L. Green, with assistance from the state and federal governments and the Lions clubs of the area, installed and outfitted a candy and tobacco stand in the post office's lobby. It was operated by Eldon Littell. Green turned the keys of the fully-stocked stand over to Littell, a member of the Foothill Service Club for the Blind, in an informal ceremony that included Mayor Albert C. Lane and Ray Barker, chair of the Foothill Council for the Blind.
NEWS
The Los Angeles Times | August 5, 2011
Californians are kicking the habit. The rate of adult smoking has dropped sharply over the last two decades, reaching its lowest level on record, largely because of aggressive tobacco control campaigns by state and local governments, officials said. Last year, 11.9% of Californians said they smoked, down from 25.9% in 1984, the earliest data available, according to the California Department of Public Health. Only one other state had a lower smoking rate last year: Utah with 9.1%.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | January 22, 2011
Glendale and Burbank maintained their high marks in 2010 for overall tobacco-control efforts, according to a report from the American Lung Assn. The association released its "State of Tobacco Control" report Thursday, giving Glendale an A and Burbank a B in overall tobacco regulation. Glendale was one of nine cities in Los Angeles County to receive the highest grade and has maintained that score for a third straight year. Burbank was one of 20 cities throughout the county to get a B in overall tobacco control.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert, max.zimbert@latimes.com | July 16, 2010
GLENDALE — Fewer tobacco retailers are selling to teenagers, according to the latest study released Tuesday — a reflection of tighter controls on vendors and public smoking, officials said. In the Youth Purchase Survey conducted by Glendale Adventist Medical Center, teenage volunteers were enlisted to try to purchase cigarettes from 100 Glendale stores in a sting-like operation. Of those merchants, 10% sold to minors, down from 24% during the last survey in 2006. "We found a very different tobacco retailer environment," said Guadulesa Rivera, the tobacco control program coordinator at Glendale Adventist.
NEWS
June 26, 2010
Anyone who thought our city didn't need some sort of smoking intervention were proven wrong this week when public health officials released 2007 figures that put us near the high-end of reported tobacco use. In 2007, the adult smoking rate was in the 15% to 16% range, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. It was the last survey before city officials started implementing broad anti-smoking measures meant to limit the public's exposure to second-hand smoke.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | May 1, 2010
When Crescenta Valley High School instituted a voluntary student drug testing program, a district first, for some it was a sign of innovation and progress in addressing a festering problem, but for others, like student Wayne Park, the distinction was dubious. The 18-year-old high school senior signed up for anonymous testing, but only because he said he has nothing to prove. He doesn’t use drugs, and said most of his peers don’t either. “I personally hate the drug issue, and it embarrasses me for the school,” Park said.
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