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Traffic Calming

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NEWS
July 2, 2002
Tim Willert After much debate and study and even more delay, the City Council is scheduled to tackle Phase II of the city's traffic-calming master plan for the Mountain/Rossmoyne area tonight. The council will consider removing seven temporary traffic circles, installing 23 speed lumps, retaining 10 existing speed humps and raising painted medians to slow traffic speeds in the area bordered by Brand Boulevard, Mountain Street, Glendale Avenue and Monterey Road.
NEWS
October 30, 2001
OOPS! I spoke out too soon. I wrote a letter ("Traffic-calming items lower property values," Oct. 26) objecting to the new traffic-calming measures (poles and signs in the middle of some intersections) on Mountain and Stocker streets. When I read the News-Press today, I found out that these devices are temporary and were installed to test whether permanent traffic circles would help slow traffic. I also had a conversation today with a neighbor who lives on Mountain Street and has been active in trying to obtain traffic calming in the Rossmoyne area.
NEWS
November 5, 2001
In recent days, the Glendale News-Press has printed letters and one article implying that the neighborhood dislikes the traffic-calming measures installed north of Glenoaks Boulevard and east of Brand Boulevard. This is not the case. Many of the residents in the area and the adjacent areas appreciate the city of Glendale's efforts to protect each of us from drivers who violate traffic laws. I can cite numerous personal instances of watching drivers exceed the posted speed limit, ignore stop signs and stop lights and violate the pedestrians' right of way. I will keep this short by recounting one incident that occurred the very day the traffic circles appeared on Stocker Street.
NEWS
December 21, 2001
Several denizens of Glendale's residential neighborhoods have weighed in recently on the appropriateness and efficacy of traffic-calming measures in their areas. The most common of these devices take three forms. There's speed humps, which force drivers to slow down lest their suspensions shoot them into the air when they hit the raised pavement; traffic circles, which steer drivers into a roundabout where they eventually can turn off onto the street they want (no criss-crossed streets)
NEWS
March 22, 2002
Re: "Do away with traffic circles, and just add a lot more stop signs." The Rossmoyne/Mountain Homeowners' Assn., in 1996, began a campaign to control the speeding and cut-through traffic in this small residential neighborhood. At the outset the request was simple. We wanted the "Beverly Hills" plan, which is stop signs at all intersections. This plan is extremely effective, does not cost much to implement, and could be set in place in a few days.
NEWS
December 7, 2001
There have been some interesting letters in the News-Press around the latest traffic-calming measure -- traffic circles. Traffic circles appear to be the wave of the future. I also am one of those who does not live in the area where the traffic calming is taking place. The latest tirade was from Lucy Hirt. She states she has lived in Glendale since 1943 and wants us all to know that the safety island at Geneva and Mountain streets is dangerous, tedious and tricky.
NEWS
January 28, 2002
I am encouraging residents in my neighborhood, Rossmoyne/Mountain, to take a long-term view regarding traffic calming. First, traffic in our neighborhood is certain to increase. Enrollment at Glendale College is going to increase. Also, a large apartment complex is planned for the vacant lot at the corner of Central and Stocker. Both of these developments will increase traffic on streets that already exceed city standards. Our neighborhood needs to decide if we are a residential neighborhood or a traffic corridor.
NEWS
July 27, 2007
Genuine traffic measures needed Here I am, once again reading about the out-of-control traffic in Glendale. Early Monday morning, a man was found dead under a woman's car ("Woman finds body under car," Tuesday). How many deaths will it take for this city to get serious about its traffic problems? Glendale has one of the worst traffic records for a city its size in the country. Yes, I said country, not the county. However, even with this dismal record, the city lacks genuine traffic-calming measures.
NEWS
March 18, 2002
I wish to write in support of the letter by Theodore Polychonis, who believes that Glendale's streets belong to the public. He is right, and the public is not just Glendale, but the entire state of California. Glendale is a city that ringed by freeways -- the Pasadena (210) Freeway to the north, the Golden State (5) Freeway to the east and south, the Ventura (134) Freeway through the heart of Glendale, and the Glendale (2) Freeway on the east. These freeways encourage traffic, and as we all know, the freeways become congested.
NEWS
March 25, 2002
This is an open letter to Kerry Morford and Jano Baghdanian, requesting permission to enter the Rossmoyne/Mountain traffic-calming plan in the Rube Goldberg Contest for the most elaborate and complex design for achieving the simplest task. Nearly six years ago, residents of the Rossmoyne/Mountain neighborhood approached the city to help with speeding traffic on the streets by installing stop signs at every intersection. We were told by Mr. Morford and company that stop signs were not the answer.
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FEATURES
March 26, 2009
Colleges need a funding boost The recession has brought many unemployed, laid-off workers and high school students to community colleges (“Smaller budget cuts could still limit classes,” March 11). The classes are being filled up very quickly every semester. The enrollment is going up, while the class availability is going down. The more people being laid off, the more people turn to community colleges for additional skills. More than ever, high school students end up choosing a two-year college over a four-year university because community colleges are only $20 a unit.
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NEWS
January 21, 2003
Traffic-calming problem already has been solved Re: Traffic-calming improvements in the Rossmoyne-Mountain area. We were invited to the Dec. 12 meeting of the Public Works Division for an informational meeting regarding the planned permanent traffic-calming channels in this area. At this meeting, we were informed that the City Council has approved all of these calming features and there would be no further discussion or input by the citizens. The City Council, of course, has approved the overall proposed traffic-calming program.
NEWS
July 2, 2002
Tim Willert After much debate and study and even more delay, the City Council is scheduled to tackle Phase II of the city's traffic-calming master plan for the Mountain/Rossmoyne area tonight. The council will consider removing seven temporary traffic circles, installing 23 speed lumps, retaining 10 existing speed humps and raising painted medians to slow traffic speeds in the area bordered by Brand Boulevard, Mountain Street, Glendale Avenue and Monterey Road.
NEWS
June 15, 2002
Residents eager to see whether the City Council will vote to implement a traffic calming master plan in the Mountain/Rossmoyne area Tuesday will have to wait. Officials took the item off the council's agenda to do additional study on the issue, City Manager Jim Starbird said. "We're taking it off for more evaluation and even more exploration of different alternatives," he said. "Rather than this continue to be a three-ring circus with no conclusion, we're holding it over to get more information and continue to work with the residents who have competing views on this to see if we can arrive at some consensus or conclusion."
NEWS
May 2, 2002
Your article on the luxury condos under construction on North Central Avenue is an important wake-up call. This 223-unit development will have a profound negative impact on neighborhood traffic and the local schools. Unfortunately, the citizens living in the surrounding neighborhoods will bear the consequences of this poorly planned development. Many streets in the area -- including my neighborhood, Rossmoyne/Mountain -- already exceed recommended traffic volumes.
NEWS
March 26, 2002
Karen S. Kim NORTHEAST GLENDALE -- A set of plastic traffic barriers, which have recently sparked fierce debate among some residents in the city's Rossmoyne district, were vandalized Monday, police said. Fourteen plastic poles that were bonded to the ground as part of temporary traffic circles installed in six locations in the Mountain-Rossmoyne area "were cut or damaged," said Officer David Buckley, a Glendale traffic investigator. It is unlikely that the poles were run over by a car on accident, Buckley said.
NEWS
March 25, 2002
This is an open letter to Kerry Morford and Jano Baghdanian, requesting permission to enter the Rossmoyne/Mountain traffic-calming plan in the Rube Goldberg Contest for the most elaborate and complex design for achieving the simplest task. Nearly six years ago, residents of the Rossmoyne/Mountain neighborhood approached the city to help with speeding traffic on the streets by installing stop signs at every intersection. We were told by Mr. Morford and company that stop signs were not the answer.
NEWS
March 22, 2002
Re: "Do away with traffic circles, and just add a lot more stop signs." The Rossmoyne/Mountain Homeowners' Assn., in 1996, began a campaign to control the speeding and cut-through traffic in this small residential neighborhood. At the outset the request was simple. We wanted the "Beverly Hills" plan, which is stop signs at all intersections. This plan is extremely effective, does not cost much to implement, and could be set in place in a few days.
NEWS
March 18, 2002
I wish to write in support of the letter by Theodore Polychonis, who believes that Glendale's streets belong to the public. He is right, and the public is not just Glendale, but the entire state of California. Glendale is a city that ringed by freeways -- the Pasadena (210) Freeway to the north, the Golden State (5) Freeway to the east and south, the Ventura (134) Freeway through the heart of Glendale, and the Glendale (2) Freeway on the east. These freeways encourage traffic, and as we all know, the freeways become congested.
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