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September 8, 2009
So this group of residents who decided to roll the dice on staying at their properties and putting their neighbors’ properties on the line as well (“In prevent defense,” Sept. 7) gave themselves a nifty name. How foolish. Since they decided to become fire and weather experts, I wonder how they would have faced their neighbors had the firemen spent time rescuing and helping these people get out at the last minute when conditions changed. After all, there were a reported dozen of these residents who would have clogged the streets with their departing cars.
NEWS
By Robert S. Hong | April 2, 2007
CITY HALL — After recently getting a green light from the California Public Utilities Commission to build a controversial at-grade railroad crossing at Flower Street, city officials are now fulfilling their part of the bargain — upgrading crossings throughout the city with state-of-the-art technology. The City Council will vote Tuesday on measures that could begin that process. "As part of our settlement [with commission staff and other interested parties] we needed to show commitment to some other improvements," City Manager Jim Starbird said.
NEWS
By Robert S. Hong | March 16, 2007
GLENDALE — The California Public Utilities Commission gave the green light to a controversial at-grade railroad crossing proposed for Flower Street Thursday, an action that has received nods from city officials and resentment from nearby residents. Now that the commission — which has the final say on any new railroad crossings in the state — has given its approval, the city can move forward with its design plans. "I was originally against the crossing as it was proposed, I wanted to make sure it was safe," City Councilman Bob Yousefian said.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | March 10, 2009
CITY HALL — The Pelanconi neighborhood of northwest Glendale, frustrated by the inevitable restructuring of San Fernando Road, unloaded on city officials Monday evening. Residents who live mostly between San Fernando Road and Glenoaks Boulevard above the Ventura (134) Freeway have for years protested the three major infrastructure projects currently underway there. From the $2.7-million landscaping plan, to the $5.48-million at-grade railroad crossing at an extended Flower Street and the $44-million “flyover” bridge for Fairmont Avenue, their section of roadway is set to see a major transformation as the projects come online within the coming two years.
FEATURES
April 18, 2006
Finding a clue on what it means to be 'illegal' I have a question for Mike Gomez and his so-called solidarity ("Sounding a call for solidarity," Community Commentary). I enjoy going to the movies and eating the great popcorn. What would happen if, like illegal immigrants, I decided to simply stroll in and not pay for admission, and then I proceeded to get my food and not pay? If it was a foreign film, what would happen if I demanded that it be in English ? even if I knew full well that it was a foreign film?
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | October 30, 2011
The California Public Utilities Commission has reopened its review of the controversial Doran Street rail crossing in Glendale, and in a letter to stakeholders has suggested that it is leaning toward sealing the roadway off to vehicle traffic. A final decision on the rail crossing, which is near an industrial propane storage facility on the Los Angeles side of the tracks, isn't expected until November 2013, a spokesman for the commission said. But the commission said the Doran Street crossing closure “qualifies for the exemption,” meaning an environmental review would be unnecessary, but that more input was being sought.
NEWS
March 17, 2007
CITY HALL There wasn't much to see at City Council Chambers on Tuesday night — namely not much of a City Council — on a night when views were a big item on the agenda. Only three of the five councilman showed up at the meeting and one left early, forcing the meeting to be cut short. The adjourned meeting prompted dozens of Glendale residents, who nearly filled the chambers to discuss a proposed view protection ordinance, to go home disappointed. They will now have to wait until March 27 to see what the council wants in the proposed ordinance.
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September 8, 2009
So this group of residents who decided to roll the dice on staying at their properties and putting their neighbors’ properties on the line as well (“In prevent defense,” Sept. 7) gave themselves a nifty name. How foolish. Since they decided to become fire and weather experts, I wonder how they would have faced their neighbors had the firemen spent time rescuing and helping these people get out at the last minute when conditions changed. After all, there were a reported dozen of these residents who would have clogged the streets with their departing cars.
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